The Trash Blog

Who’s Interviewing Who?

In our last post we mentioned an environmental organization, EcoRI. In our efforts to track down the details of that story, we asked if we could drop by to speak to them. Mr. Frank Carini, their Executive Editor agreed to meet with us at their offices in Providence, RI.

Close by the Brown University campus, we walked past a man sitting and reading on the steps in front of a simple little house. We stopped. He stopped. “Are you Frank?” we asked. “Are you the trash blog?” he asked.

Frank CariniPleasantries out of the way, we got down to business.We started by asking Frank what it was that EcoRI did, but he stopped his answer short to ask us what the motivation was for the Trash Blog. We shortened our answer so that we could ask him how long EcoRI had been around, but before Frank answered, he wanted to know if we had a firm end-date in mind for our trash travels.

At this point we realized that we were both trying to conduct interviews. It would have made more sense if we had just decided who was interviewing who, but instead, we let the feeling slide a little and coasted on.

Needless to say there were some awkward pauses.

Somehow, despite all of us interviewing each other, we managed to learn that although EcoRI’s primary mission was to act as an environmental news source, they also operated a pretty cool compost collection service that they called Earth.

EcoRI EarthEarth is a version of something that is springing up in many urban environments where composting is not offered by the city. EcoRI will come collect your food scraps once a week and take them to be composted at a farm.

The service carries a pretty hefty price-tag: $8 per pick-up. EcoRI has experimented with the idea of having people bring their food scraps to a farmer’s market and collecting everything from that central point. But it seems the sort of people who are willing to collect their food scraps for a week and bring them to the farmer’s market are also the kind of people who are willing to pay $8 to have the scraps picked up.

Some cities are moving towards curbside collection of food scraps, but curbside collection is still far from the norm. So there is room for entrepreneurs to make a business out of food scrap collection for city-dwellers.

In addition to a great conversation, Frank gave us a couple of Dunkin’ Donut parody shirts, the logo of which is at the top of this post.

Eco RI news

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This entry was written by Philip and published on December 23, 2013 at 5:36 pm. It’s filed under Community, Compost, Environmental Justice, Non-profits and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

One thought on “Who’s Interviewing Who?

  1. Uncle Chris on said:

    “It seems the sort of people who are willing to collect their food scraps for a week and bring them to the farmer’s market are also the kind of people who are willing to pay $8 to have the scraps picked up.”

    In the end, success is associated with understanding the associated markets.

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